"“Things always become obvious after the fact” "

Nassim Nicholas Taleb

About Us

The aim of this food security web site is to stimulate ideas and examine ways of improving food security, encouraging more focus on preparing for the future through improved resilience to what looks likely to be an increasingly volatile climate. Our site offers an independent source of analysis, commentary and news about food security from leading members of the research sector.

Join the discussion on food security via our LinkedIn group. Food Security 2050 is about preparing for the future and thinking about where we would like to be in 35 years time or more. If it’s good enough for companies like Toyota to have +50 year planning horizons then it must surely be time for food to be in the same space. We’ll let you know when new stories have been posted.

Feel free to post comments on stories, suggest links or even submit a post for publishing with us.

In the meantime the new report on food security can be viewed at thisi link:

http://www.nccarf.edu.au/publications/food-security-risk-management-and-climate-change

Food Security

Food security is not just about food or security. It extends through supply and demand for food to access, to the way in which food is used, through to how people look after and take responsibility for their personal health.

That’s one of the findings of the recent report produced by Wondu Business & Technology Services (www.wondu.com) for the Australian Government (Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency) and the National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility at Griffith University in Queensland.

The challenges for food security are diverse and complex including the regulatory environment, climate change and risk management expertise for dealing with a growing list of uncertainties.

Some businesses and countries will get it right and others will be left short.

Food Policy

The regulatory climate is emerging as an important driver of food security.

Policy makers face complex challenges in dealing with food regulations which are often designed to protect food safety and quality, the environment and animal welfare, but not always with concern for food security.

Looking forward higher prices may/will have to be paid to achieve food security.

That’s one of the findings of the recent report produced by Wondu Business & Technology Services (www.wondu.com) for the Australian Government (Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency) and the National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility at Griffith University in Queensland.

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